Waterpik (or similar) vs. flossing

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married2abuckeye
Posts: 80
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2007 7:28 pm
Location: Florida

Waterpik (or similar) vs. flossing

#1 Post by married2abuckeye »

Any thoughts on using a Waterpik or similar water jet exclusively without flossing? Is it as good as flossing, or does it simply compliment regular flossing?

(I'm asking you all your opinions before my ortho appointment, which is in 2.5 days...)

Thanks!!

Kirsten

cwatt1
Posts: 429
Joined: Mon May 28, 2007 8:05 am
Location: Northern Illinois

#2 Post by cwatt1 »

Seriously, I think that's an excellent approach. I think its a matter of opinion, but your dentist is the only source I can recall that puts WaterPiks on a par with flossing.

My own ortho, in the manual he gives all of his patients, refers to them as "nice to remove food particles but this DOES NOT replace brushing and flossing" (BTW, that's my ortho's emphasis, not mine).
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Dvi
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2007 6:51 am

Waterpik (or similar) vs flossing

#3 Post by Dvi »

I too noticed it was taking me forever to floss my teeth. I purchased the Waterpik Flosser its not a water jet; small flossing tips (which are disposalable) vibrate to creat friction on the teeth. You're able to stick the flossing tips anywhere. I do follow up with dental floss but I dont have to be as aggresive because the Waterpik has take a good amount yucky stuff away.

dvi

Daz1865
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue Jan 23, 2007 4:01 pm

#4 Post by Daz1865 »

I bought a waterpik last week and was a bit disappointed tbh. It just shoots water out, I dont know what I was expecting really but a few lights and sounds on it wouldn't have gone a miss :P

I can tell it is making some difference though and my gums do look a bit healthier and it is easier to get stuff from out your braces as mentioned.

I got drenched (as did the bathroom) the first time I used it :oops:

MazingerZ
Posts: 56
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2005 9:10 pm
Location: Arlington, VA

#5 Post by MazingerZ »

I have a waterpik that I haven't used in years. Hate it. What a waste of money.

rsprouse
Posts: 524
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#6 Post by rsprouse »

I don't think I am anyone on this boards dentist so you don't have to listen to me, but I am not aware of any credible research that indicates any form of at home treatment is as consistant and thorough as dental floss for cleaning interproximal spaces and below the gumline. I hope somebody invents something one day that is better and allows for easier patient compliance, but we are not there yet. That being said, I don't care if you floss as it keeps Us in business if you don't :D (just a joke!!)

Best,
Rory

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married2abuckeye
Posts: 80
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2007 7:28 pm
Location: Florida

#7 Post by married2abuckeye »

Ha ha, rsprouse! I think that in the past few months I have singlehandedly put both my dentist's and my ortho's kids through college :shock: Sad how expensive a lifetime of tooth neglect can be! Oh well, I've changed my ways and am on the road to a healthy smile :-#)

Thanks, everyone, for your input on this subject!

Kirsten
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sonicoliver
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Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:45 am

waterpik in Australia

#8 Post by sonicoliver »

I live in Melbourne and purchased a water pik from the shaver shop in chadstone, they said they had just got them in to see how they go.

Flossing with my braces takes a good 15 mins, so a 1 minute pass with the water pik seems too good to be true.

I am going floss-less for the next month on the basis of the water pik's own claims that it can replace floss, and will see if my orthodontist is pleased or not. Slightly dangerous game to play with my own teeth, but I'm getting an examination at that time specifically in relation to my at home care (how well I brush, floss etc), and it's only 1 month...

Will try to come back here to let you know.

sonicoliver
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:45 am

#9 Post by sonicoliver »

Yeah, Melbourne in Australia... as in, the water pik is available as an import at the shaver shop's here now...

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636chick
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#10 Post by 636chick »

Meryaten wrote:So, Seriously - looks like your dentist is not the only fan of water jets:
Water jets are wonderful at reducing periodontal pathogens in pockets up to six millimeters and reducing bleeding and inflammation. For perio purposes, the motion of the water pulsing across the opening of the sulcus/pocket creates a suction that virtually sucks out the free-floating bacteria from under the gingival crest. This action dramatically decreases the number of pathogens in the pocket. Instructions -The tip of the water jet should be pointing directly between the teeth from the outside to the inside, apical to the contact - not directly at the pocket - for flushing.
http://www.dentalgentlecare.com/o_h__fitness_report.htm

All in all, I like your approach - both flossing and using the Waterpik.
This has been my experience, my pockets have become smaller and my gums much healthier. My dentist was even shocked.

chemicalfan
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:36 am
Location: Portsmouth, UK

#11 Post by chemicalfan »

This isn't directly related to Waterpiks or whatever, but I saw my hygienist on Friday, as I haven't flossed since being braced on the 8th (couldn't figure out how, ortho office didn't mention it at all). I mentioned floss threaders - those 'eye of a needle' devices, and she said they were garbage, as it was nearly impossible to apply enough force to get the floss between the teeth. I've had an awful time with flossing in the past, and found a happy medium with 'floss picks' - a disposable device that looks like a wishbone, with a string of floss between the 'bones'. Obviously, these are impossible with braces, so I mentioned it, and she suggested using the smallest inter-dental brushes instead. Bend the brush 90 degrees, and then slide the brush under the wire and between the teeth. Don't use it to brush, just to floss, but where it is a stiff wire, and really small, it fits between the teeth easily. It's a little weird compared to floss, but nothing major, and it's dead easy - as quick as flossing used to be before being wired!

wcllana
Posts: 16
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 10:14 am

Waterpiks $160 US in Australia?

#12 Post by wcllana »

Waterpiks $160US in Australia?

Why does Waterpik hate Aussie's so much? Did someone in coporate HQ try Marmite?

Couldn't you order one from the US or SE Asia and even with shipping/duty get one for under $100AUS?

wcllana
Posts: 16
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 10:14 am

Waterpiks cant replace floss because of the nature of plaque

#13 Post by wcllana »

Waterpiks can't replace floss because of the nature of plaque

Read the quote carefully:

[quote]Water jets are wonderful at reducing periodontal pathogens in pockets up to six millimeters and reducing bleeding and inflammation. For perio purposes, the motion of the water pulsing across the opening of the sulcus/pocket creates a suction that virtually sucks out the free-floating bacteria from under the gingival crest. This action dramatically decreases the number of pathogens in the pocket. Instructions -The tip of the water jet should be pointing directly between the teeth from the outside to the inside, apical to the contact - not directly at the pocket - for flushing.[[/quote]

It doesn't refer to removing plaque, but to reducing bacteria in gingival pockets, which I'm sure it does. But plaque is a different matter.

Bacteria creates a thin film that sticks to surfaces like glue and needs significant mechanical action to remove. While a Waterpik could remove plaque if the jet where powerful enough it would cause so much gum damage there would be no point.

I think the Waterpik is a great addition to the cleaning routine and the only part I ever found fun - see my next post.

jz2888
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 4:23 am

Waterpik in Australia

#14 Post by jz2888 »

Where in Australia can I purchase Waterpik and what's the price?

Thanks

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ultra
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Re: Waterpik (or similar) vs. flossing

#15 Post by ultra »

My dentist recommended using a waterpik and regular floss - I agree with him. Using a Waterpik is great for ortho patients who need the extra cleaning, but regular floss is always going to get right up into the gum line between the teeth. So for very thorough cleaning I say use both.

I also live in NZ where the Waterpik flosser is more expensive, but so is everything else!

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